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    Thahaba and Kharaja

    By ArabicTree | November 24, 2007

    In this post, we’ll glance over two common verbs–thahaba and kharaja.

    Thahaba (ذَهَبَ) means “he went”, or “he travelled.” The female third-person form is “thahabat.” You can use it like this:

    بِلالُ ذَهَبَ الَ السُوقِ (Bilaalu thahaba ila il-suwq): Bilaal went to the market.

    Kharaja (خَرَجَ) is the opposite of thahaba–it means “he exited” or “he left.” The female third-person form is “kharajat.” You can use it like this:

    عائِشَةُ خَرَجَت مِن المَدرَسَّةِ (’Aaishatu kharajat min al-madrassati): ‘Aaisha left from the school.

    You always use ila (to) with thahaba and min (from) with kharaja. (Unlike English–in English, you can mix and match. Not so in Arabic.) This example combines both:

    الإمَلمُ خَرَجَ مِن بَيتِهِ ذَهَبَ إلَ المَسجِدِ: The imam left from his house and went to the masjid.

    As for WHY the female is kharajat and thahabat (and not kharaja and thahaba), read up on verb conjugation.

    Topics: Beginner, Grammar | 1 Comment »

    One Response to “Thahaba and Kharaja”

    1. Abdul Raheem Says:
      November 15th, 2010 at 3:04 pm

      JazakAllah, I was searching for the EXACT question and here I go :) :)

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